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ISO 19650 certification

Introduction and Overview

The International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO) have published the first two international standards for Building Information Modelling (BIM) noted below with their UK references codes:


BS EN ISO 19650–1 Organisation of information about construction works – Information management using building information modelling – Part 1: concepts and principles, and

BS EN ISO 19650-2 Organisation of information about construction works – Information management using building information modelling – Part 2: Delivery phase of assets.

These two ISO 19650 standards supersede BS1192:2007 + A2:2016 (principles) and PAS1192 part 2 (capital/delivery phase).

BS EN ISO 19650-3 Organization of information about construction works Information management using building information modelling – Part 3: Operational phase of assets

BS EN ISO 19650-4 Organization of information about construction works Information management using building information modelling – Part 4: Information exchange

BS EN ISO 19650-5 Organization of information about construction works – Information management using building information modelling – Part 5: Security-minded approach to information management.

There are no plans at the moment for BS1192-4 to become an ISO.


The principles of both BS EN ISO 19650 parts 1 and 2 are founded on the UK’s standards for information management using BIM and will be identifiable to those that are already using BS1192 and PAS1192-2.  BS EN ISO 19650 is fundamentally an internationalisation of the UK’s BIM L2 model and contains all the same principles and high-level requirements with specific UK content contained in our National Annex.

 

Why are we moving to international BIM standards?


The UK’s decision to trigger the move from BIM Level 2 as a UK Standard to international standards is rooted back to 2011 and the ‘Report for the Government Construction Client Group – BIM Strategy Paper.’ The report encouraged the greater adoption of BIM within the UK domestic construction sector and at the same time recognised that BIM would become a disruptive and ‘game changing’ way of working which would have a profound effect on global construction, further, that BIM technologies and processes transcended national or geographic borders.   Therefore, during the development of the UK BIM Programme there was growing consensus that BIM-globalisation would inevitably push towards international norms and standards.


Accordingly, the UK, working through its national standard body [BSI], industry and academic organisations and networks, used its existing suite of standards which, by that time, had demonstrated its effectiveness as a tool to aid systematic adoption, as a foundation for collaboration with other nations to develop international standards.  The premise of this collaborative approach was that benefits would be realised by all nations, including a common security-minded approach to the adoption of these powerful data/information rich models and tools. Collaterally it was anticipated that such a response would also lay the foundations for a level playing field for international markets and foster trade.  

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